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Hypoglycemia

What Is It?

Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the pancreas overreacts to repeated high sugar intake by producing too much insulin. The excess insulin lowers blood sugar too much causing symptoms that can include depression, irritability, fatigue, headaches, shakiness, nausea and blurred vision. Two key causative factors are stress and poor diet (too much sugar and refined carbohydrates). The human pancreas was designed by nature before the Paleolithic era when there were no concentrated sugars, sugary snacks and processed or refined food. Our modern diet puts a tremendous strain on both the pancreas and the adrenal glands (which also help to keep blood sugar levels steady). Other factors that can aggravate hypoglycemia include drinking alcohol on an empty stomach and/or drinking too much alcohol, high caffeine intake, fad diets for weight loss, food allergies, kidney failure, liver damage, poorly functioning pancreas, exhausted adrenals, hypothyroidism, eating meals that are too large.

Risks

If you eat too much sugar and refined carbohydrates (pastries, cake, pies, ice cream, white bread or pasta, candy, cookies, etc.), you are at risk for developing hypoglycemia. If you add unmanaged stress to the equation, the risk goes up. If you have hypoglycemia and do not address it, you are at risk for developing Type II Diabetes. The following table might help you to determine if hypoglycemia is a problem or potential problem for you.

No

Mild

Moderate

Severe

TOTAL

Crave sweets

0

1

2

3

 

Irritable if a meal is missed

0

1

2

3

 

Feel tired or weak if a meal is missed

0

1

2

3

 

Dizziness when standing suddenly

0

1

2

3

 

Frequent headaches

0

1

2

3

 

Poor memory (forgetful) or concentration

0

1

2

3

 

Feel tired an hour or so after eating

0

1

2

3

 

Heart palpitations

0

1

2

3

 

Feel shaky at times

0

1

2

3

 

Afternoon fatigue

0

1

2

3

 

Vision blurs on occasion

0

1

2

3

 

Depression or mood swings

0

1

2

3

 

Overweight

0

1

2

3

 

Frequently anxious or nervous

0

1

2

3

 

TOTAL

 

 

 

 

 

Scoring:
<5, hypoglycemia is not a likely factor
6-15, hypoglycemia is a likely factor
>15, hypoglycemia is extremely likely

Dietary Considerations

  • A high-complex carbohydrate, high-plant fiber diet is the diet of choice in the treatment of hypoglycemia (and diabetes).
  • Eliminate refined, processed and preserved foods.
  • Eliminate sugars, alcohol, fried, fatty, and high cholesterol (saturated fat) foods. Avoid all fatty dairy foods. Also avoid aspartame (Nutrasweet, Equal).
  • Eat chromium-rich foods such as whole grains, string beans, cucumbers, soy foods, onions, garlic, fruits, and wheat germ.
  • Dietary fiber improves glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. Water-soluble fiber is the most beneficial. Good sources include legumes (beans), oat bran, nuts, seeds, psyllium seed husks, pears, apples, and most vegetables.
  • Protein sources should be mainly from seafood and legumes with a small amount of free-range poultry. Adding some healthy fat like olive oil and flaxseed oil is a good idea.

Lifestyle Modifications

  • Develop an appropriate exercise program which elevates heart rate at least 60% of maximum for a half an hour three times a week.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Avoid alcohol.
  • Eat several 6 – 8 small meals throughout the day instead of 2 – 3 large meals to stabilize blood sugar.

Supplementation

  • Protein Shake: as a breakfast, mid-morning or afternoon snack feeds the Adrenal glands and steadies blood sugar levels.
  • Vitamin C (with bioflavonoids): 2,000-3,000 mg daily (helpful for Adrenal insufficiency)
  • Adrenal glandular extract: 200-600 mg per day (Strengthening the adrenals is very important).
  • B vitamins (daily): B complex (100 mg) with 2,500 mcg of B-12; 500 mg of pantothenic acid (helps convert glucose into energy); 250 mg of niacin. Sugary and refined foods leach B vitamins from the body and damage friendly bacteria that produce B vitamins for us.
  • Minerals (daily): 200-400 mcg of chromium; 50 mg of zinc; 200 mcg of selenium; 300-500 mg of magnesium ( magnesium activates over 50% of the body’s enzymes including 6 of the 9 sugar metabolizing enzymes; 30 mg of manganese
  • Glutamine: 500 mg daily
  • Pancreatin: 1,200 mg with meals
  • Royal Jelly stimulates the Adrenals without weakening them.
  • Spirulina, chlorella and blue-green algae have a stabilizing effect on blood sugar.

 

 

The nutritional suggestions in this material are not offered to treat, mitigate or cure disease, and should not be used as a substitute for sound medical advice. This information is designed to be used in conjunction with the services of a trained, licensed healthcare practitioner.

 
     
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